Tag Archives: Immunology

The bacteria in your belly Pt. 3 – Disrupting the balance

ResearchBlogging.orgIn the previous two posts we have established how the microbiome is established and then the pressures the host puts on it to maintain a balance between the required functions and the commensal bacteria providing them. In this post I want to look a little deeper at what happens if this balance is disturbed or never properly forms at all. Continue reading

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The Wednesday Post (24/11/10)

This post is a bit of a cop out. I hadn’t planned anything because I was going to re-spruik my most recent effort at the Scientific American.

This time I wrote about the role a bacteria, nematodes and insects play in glowing war wounds. You can find the post here and of course my previous post is still here. Both can still be shared using the not-so-fancy share buttons at the bottom.

Once again thanks to BoraZ (@BoraZ for twitterers) for inviting me to contribute.

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The bacteria in your belly Pt. 2 – Adults

ResearchBlogging.org

In the last post I talked about babies eating poo how babies develop a gut flora. In this post I wanted to look at how that flora matures into adulthood.

As a baby grows it interacts with its environment and after about a year an infant’s flora will resemble their parent’s. This becomes particularly important as the baby starts to eat solid foods and no longer survives on a milk diet. Now any and all bacteria can have a shot at colonising. So what shapes the bacterial population from this point onwards? Tolerance dictates this uneasy state of play. Continue reading

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The Wednesday Post (10/11/10)

ResearchBlogging.org

We try to not be alarmist here at Disease of the Week but two papers were brought to my attention by a PhD student in the discipline (this one and this one). The first response to a new paper should be that the researchers have moulded the current understanding and made some new insights. I have never approached reading papers this way, to my own detriment it must be noted. I always expect each and every paper to have changed the world.

With that preamble I present two papers WHICH CHANGE OUR UNDERSTANDING OF IMMUNOLOGY AS WE KNOW IT! Continue reading

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The bacteria in your belly Pt.1 – Babies

ResearchBlogging.org

From one series to another it seems. For the next few of my posts I want to look at how the gut flora develops in infants and changes throughout life. We have mentioned the gut flora before but its role in maintaining the human condition is becoming more involved the more we look as we find that the bacterial hitch-hikers in our bellies are not simply the parasites they were once considered to be.

In this post I shall discuss the development of the gut flora in infants and its role in determining paediatric disease but in future posts I will talk about what happens when this process is altered and the adult microbiome.

Pictured: Science

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Why dont we just leave it to antimicrobials?

This post was chosen as an Editor's Selection for ResearchBlogging.orgIn the last of my vaccine sub-series (the others can be found here, here, here and here) I wanted to talk about why vaccines trump therapeutics every time or at least just a few reasons why.

Something I hear occasionally when talking about vaccines is that they are not required as we have drugs to deal with sickness. It’s true we have developed everything from cold and flu meds to antibiotics and chemotherapy but vaccines are still, in my opinion, the greatest advancement in public health after improved sanitation. Continue reading

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What’s in a vaccine?

ResearchBlogging.org

Waaaaaay back in the first post of my sub series on vaccines I said I would cover vaccine styles, how they work (and Pt. 2) and why we can’t rely on therapeutics alone. I promise I’ll get to the last one at some point but after a couple of weeks writing about vaccines something occurred to me that I hadn’t really thought about before, what is actually in a vaccine? Continue reading

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